The Pygmalion Effect 3E, Managing the Power of Expectations

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It’s a fact. Limited expectations bring limited results, high expectations lead to exceptional results. The phenomenon is known as the Pygmalion Effect and it has been documented numerous times in both business and education. The good news is that you can teach your managers how to create the positive results of the Pygmalion Effect with their employees, improving productivity and morale in the process.

CRM’s revised Pygmalion Effect training program clearly illustrates that the way we view subordinates can completely change the outcome of any given project.

In the video, trainees get a complete overview of the Pygmalion Effect through real-life examples, dramatic vignettes and scenes from the classic movie “Pygmalion,” where individuals are transformed through the positive (or negative) expectations of another. The four ways managers transmit expectations to their subordinates – climate, feedback, input and output – are also depicted.

The Pygmalion Effect is part of a long line of CRM Learning Pygmalion programs that have been favorites of trainers for more than twenty years.

New features of this third edition include video footage from a Pygmalion training session at the Dunn Edwards paint company and a powerful reenactment of a Dunn Edwards “positive Pygmalion” success story, plus an all-new interview with topic expert Dr. Robert Rosenthal.

Expanded workshop tools help participants fully grasp the importance of managing their expectations and enable them to develop comprehensive short- and long-term plans for applying the Pygmalion principles in their daily work environments.

This information, along with exercises contained in the program’s expanded Leader’s Guide and Participant Workbook, teaches your managers to:

  • Understand how positive/negative expectations create self-fulfilling prophecies
  • Develop the skills to positively influence coworkers and subordinates
  • Raise the expectations they have for their staff members
  • Believe more in their own ability to positively influence and lead others